Year in review

My Year in Review

Wooooooeeeeeeeee. Now that was a year.  Yet again, I’m starting an” end of year’ review post with “wow that was big”. Which has me wondering why I am always surprised. And what would a small year look like? And would I enjoy a small year? Dunno. But what I do know folks, this is the best activity you can do all year. It puts things in perspective and helps you frame up how you want to enter 2018

 

 

 

Clients

This year digital transformation and agile were the dominant themes along with the need to work in global timezones (hint, that makes the year even bigger whether you like it or not, it messes with your ability to be ‘at rest’).

I worked with global engineers, technology recruiting, state public servants, e-commerce businesses, and global agri business. Variety remained core to the client base, if not the type of work. And such very good people to work with – I am blessed.

New products

I scaled down the one-on-one coaching and launched a new group webinar coaching product.

I created a new Agile leadership program with fellow Change Agent World Wide member Simon Terry.

I reinvigorated the Conversations of Change Retreats and piloted the new format.

All of these went really well – which while pretty bloody awesome is also a bit daunting, you kinda expect some glitches (ok, found them!) and some ideas to be shelved. Not so much…

Maintenance and growth

I maintained the podcasts and watched the downloads and subscribers grow amazingly. Crikey!

Lena Ross and I also continued our #brainpickers series on youtube.

I partnered with the very fabulous BuzzPop Social to ensure that my social feeds were quality and engaging – if you think you saw more of me this year, it was the good work of Kate Ware, I reserved my time for engaging with people on social media, not posting or content creation. Where can I automate?” remained an enabling question all year round. I had very mixed experiences with outsourcing and delegating this year – I did more of it, it was hard work, and sometimes really dissapointing. It gave me an appreciation of why the clients I work with appreciate my attention to delivery and managing expectations. And also some good lessons in how to outsource and delegate better in future years because trust me, I made some really dumb mistakes.

Community & Speaking

I was an industry lecturer for Code Australia and an alumni facilitator for Daryl Conner in his 2017 Raising Your Game program.

I spoke with the folks from Able and How for OCtober, Trevor Young on my podcast, Des Walsh on his podcast, Elise Stevens on her podcast, Change Management Review on social media,  and also the CMO Magazine on how Marketers need to embrace change.

I also guest lectured at the University of Ottawa Institute for Strategic Communication and Change and brought Wonder Woman out to play at the Allegra Think Tank in June, talked change success metrics at a PMI breakfast and also provided a webinar for CMI on social media

And drumroll…

And I launched my book. Oh yes, The Book. Where in one night we out trended the Bachelor’s Australian launch on twitter!! What a trip!! People have asked me what is the hardest bit about writing a book – and it is by far the production and publicising it. A huge thank you to everyone who has supported me in this endeavour, I can’t tell you how much I appreciate what you have done and especially those of you who have contacted me with feedback about the book. Sales have far surpassed what is standard for self published books and for that I couldn’t be more grateful. It has been enthralling, confronting, confusing, and rewarding all wrapped up in one bundle.

What does this mean for 2018?

In processing my year in review and the huge variety of stuff that has happened in 2017, I feel like I have an enormous amount of data to analyse. The early themes for me are:

  • Whether I identify with the role of educator or not, that’s how many of my community see me. There is not always an appetite to pay for this knowledge though. I need to work through the commercial implications of this.
  • Building change capability at a practitioner level is not going to shift the dial as quickly and significantly as building change maturity with change leaders – I need to work with a greater volume of business leaders to have greater impact on how organisations deal with change.
  • I love speaking – this energises me, I’m really good at it, I need to do more.
  • I’m really good at developing new products. Expect more.
  • Currently, I’m probably quite confusing to many – they experience me professionally in many and varied forms. I’m not sure this is helpful to me, or others so I’ll be seeking to reduce that confusion.

And what will the theme of 2018 be?

When I re-read what I have written above and acknowledge the swirling joyous messiness that was 2017, I don’t know I want to change all that much. Simplify, automate, streamline, but not change the variety. Which means I need to ensure that I am well resourced internally to ride this crazy trip. And for me that means Serenity. Cultivating inner peace. Flow.

Serenity

If with every opportunity, every engagement, every task I take on I do a serenity check first – will this bring me serenity / peace / flow or how do I ensure that I maintain a state of serenity / peace / flow, I’ll end the year in pretty good shape. What about you?

Peace out 😉

 

mm
Dr Jen Frahm – Author of Conversations of Change: A guide to implementing workplace change.

2 Comments

  1. Kate Ware says:

    Thanks for the lovely mention Jen! It’s been a quite a year but a really awesome one. Looking forward to 2018 and the serenity it brings Dr Jen x

  2. Simon Terry says:

    Thank you for a wonderful year and for the experience of a couple of successful shared projects. Congratulations on all you achieved and for the insight of these great reflections. My only suggestion is don’t let other people’s desire for simplicity and certainty limit your ambitions or amazingly diverse talents. Some times the world (& the work of change agents) just has to be confusing to others.

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